Solar Eclipses ~ A Gallery of Photos by members of the Kopernik Astronomical Society


Total eclipses of the Sun are among the most dramatic of sky phenomena. As the Moon blots out the life-giving Sun, it seems, if only for a few seconds, like the very processes of nature have stopped.

People have observed Eclipses since ancient times, often with alarm. However, today, eager observers travel the globe to witness these awe-inspiring phenomena. A number of Kopernik Astronomical Society Members have made the trek to exotic places to observe the elusive total eclipse. Below you will find the pictures and stories they have brought home. You will also see Partial Solar Eclipse photos, and also, images of the unusual Annular Eclipse that happened right here in southern New York.


The Partial Solar Eclipse of December 25th, 2000


The Partial Solar Eclipse of Dec. 25th, 2000.

Photo taken by KAS Member G. Normandin from Maine, New York.


The Partial Solar Eclipse of Dec. 25th, 2000.

Photo taken by KAS Member G. Normandin from Maine, New York.

These are photos of eclipsed sun projected on to a piece of paper using a 6-inch F/4.5 Newtonian telescope. Since it was snowing off and on and the wind chill was -25 Deg. F., I decided to try observing thru a window (with a screen). I was amazed to find that I could not only see the outline of the eclipsed sun, but also details in three large sunspot groups.


The Total Solar Eclipse of February 26th, 1998
Photos by Tony Pilato, KAS

Diamond Ring
The Diamond Ring Effect ~
It only lasts a few fleeting seconds. This is caused by the last rays of sunlight streaming through the mountain valleys on the edge of the Moon.
The Inner Corona ~

A short exposure shows detail
close the sun.

Totality

The Full Glory Of Totality ~

crescents

During the partial phase, multiple images of the partially eclipsed sun projected onto a board. ~


The Solar Eclipse of February 26th, 1998
Video from Kopernik Space Ed. Center

Partial Eclipse from Kopernik This was a partial eclipse as viewed from Kopernik. The moon never covered more than about 16% of the sun. This time sequence starts in the upper left. The images run clockwise. ~


The Annular Solar Eclipse of May 10th, 1994
Photos by Jay Edwards, KAS

Annular Eclipse

This Total Annular Eclipse was observed from Kopernik.

An Annular Eclipse occurs when the moon is too far from the earth to entirely cover the sunís disk. Although just as rare as a Total Eclipse, they are far less dramatic. The bright ring of solar disk washes out any chance to see the solar corona. ~


The Total Solar Eclipse of July 11th, 1991
Photos by Jay Edwards, KAS


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Page Prepared by: G. Normandin, KAS
March 9th, 1998; Revised: December 26th, 2000